Friday, October 14, 2005

Increasing Methadone-Related Deaths Alarming

Methadone use has increased in pain management and drug replacement therapy for addicts despite hundreds of people dying each year from black market use.

(PRWEB) October 14, 2005 -- The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration’s Drug Abuse Warning Network reported that more than 10,000 people turned up in emergency rooms after having abused methadone in 2001, which is double the number from just two years earlier.

Reported deaths from methadone abuse are rising in North Carolina, Florida, West Virginia, Maryland, Montana and Nevada while it has become the deadliest drug in Oregon according to state medical examiners. Meanwhile, profits for the drug’s manufacturer and dispensers have increased dramatically as well.Methadone was developed by German chemists as a painkiller during World War II and has been widely used as drug replacement therapy to get addicts off heroin and other opiates.

There are currently more than 1,200 facilities that dispense methadone to addicts, totaling approximately 200,000 patients. While methadone may not produce the same high as heroin or Oxycontin, it is more physically addictive and more difficult to withdraw from.

The Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies (DATOS) issued a report on a multi-city study of status of patients before and after various types of treatment, including outpatient methadone treatment. The results of this study that was done in the 90’s showed that there was actually a slight increase in heavy alcohol use among methadone patients, but perhaps the most obviously overlooked flaw in this type of treatment is that the addicts are still on drugs, and this cannot be considered rehabilitation.

A new documentary called “Methadonia” is to be aired on HBO that follows the lives of several methadone patients, including one who has been on the drug for 30 years.According to J.J., a 30 year-old former heroin addict from Michigan, “I was on methadone for 5 years and it was much harder to get off than the heroin. You can’t skip a day going to the [methadone clinic or you immediately get really sick.

It’s a trap either way.” He has since become drug-free through the Narconon Arrowhead program, which consists of a uniquely effective withdrawal phase, confront and communication exercises, a dry heat sauna detoxification program that rids the body of physical drug cravings and a series of life skills courses to not only fully rehabilitate individuals but also to prepare them for life after drugs.

This comprehensive treatment approach was researched and developed by American author and humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard and this drug-free methodology is the reason for Narconon Arrowhead’s high rate for successful recovery.To get help for a loved one caught in the downward spiral of addiction or for more information, call Narconon Arrowhead today at 1-800-468-6933 or log on to www.heroinaddiction.com.

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